Kant’s categorical imperative

Kant’s three significant formulations of the categorical imperative are:

  • Act only according to that maxim by which you can also will that it would become a universal law.
  • Act in such a way that you always treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, never simply as a means, but always at the same time as an end.
  • Every rational being must so act as if he were through his maxim always a legislating member in a universal kingdom of ends.

He concludes that there is only one thing that is truly good:

Nothing in the world – indeed nothing even beyond the world – can possibly be conceived which could be called good without qualification except a good will.[11]

My¬†definition of morality – striving to eliminate suffering – is Kant’s maxim. It’s also the most significant manifestation of good will that was the most important for him.

Sources:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deontological_ethics
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categorical_imperative

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s